CorelDRAW 2018 on macOS with Parallels





Product Management is, at once, an art, a craft and a science of setting, sharing and driving teams toward a product vision that will deliver significant values to its users. Becoming a Master Product Manager requires a broad range of skills from a deep knowledge of project management and work back plans to a strong ability to build lasting relationships with others and keep them motivated. In this article, I give my view on how to define Mastery in Product Management and how to know when you are getting there for your product. Spoiler alert: It takes three.


You’ve heard the old saw: “Fast, good or cheap — pick two.” You can get good-enough quality quickly, but it won’t be cheap. You can get a great price and have it ASAP, but the quality will likely be suspect. Or you can have great quality at a great price but expect to wait for it. Developing products is a lot like that. It’s a flurry of constant choices — and compromises — that are about quality, cost, and speed. Living within these constraints can be challenging, but living without constraints will almost certainly result in failure. What’s a product manager to do?


It’s a great feeling. You come out of a productive meeting you’ve chaired happy because everyone seemed to be on the same page. They all knew what was expected of them — your requests were very specific — and the next steps you outlined were clear and meaningful. Wonderful! Then, three days later, people are asking each other if they were even at the same meeting. Just because it was clear to you doesn’t mean it was clear to them. And whose fault is that? Sorry to say, but it was probably yours.


When it comes to new products and feature introductions, we’ve all seen our share of successes — and flops that hit the floor with a loud and sudden THUD. Some launches were an instant hit while some got almost no traction — and certainly displayed no stickiness. But when success strikes, does all hell have to break loose? Can we prevent the process from collapsing under the heavy load? Perhaps we need to properly plan for success.


Once you’ve experienced the joy of flying, you will almost certainly do your very best to rationalize owning your own airplane (or, at least, a share in one). It’s good to recognize that while any analysis you conduct will be biased, having numbers will certainly help “sell” the business case for ownership to your spouse. Here’s how to put together the numbers.

Gérard Métrailler

High-Impact Business & Product Strategy Leader Passionate about Customer Value. Currently serving as the EVP Products at Corel Corp. All articles are my own.

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